Filtering Data with SciPy

Time series data may contain signals at many different frequencies. Sharp increases or decreases have a high frequency. Slow increases or decreases have a low frequency. Filtering allows us to take different frequency components out of the data.

Signal filtering is a science on its own and I’ll focus on the practical aspects here and stick to two filter types: butterworth and Chebyshev type I. Each of those filters can be used for different purposes. We can use them as low pass, high pass, band pass or notch filters. Low pass filters leave low frequencies alone but attack high frequencies. High pass filters leave high frequencies alone but attach low frequencies. The title image shows an example of low and high pass filters used on the same data. Band pass filters leave a specific frequency band alone and attack all other frequencies. Notch filters attack a specific frequency band, leaving the rest alone. Let’s look at an example.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import seaborn as sns
from scipy.signal import butter, cheby1, filtfilt

data = np.load("example_data.npy")

order = 3
Wn = 4000  # in Hz
btype = 'lowpass'
fs = 50000  # in Hz

b, a = butter(order, Wn, btype, fs = fs)
data_butter = filtfilt(b, a, data)

This is a butterworth lowpass filter with a cutoff frequency of 4000Hz (Wn). That means, signals below 4000Hz are is the pass band. They are largely left alone. Signals above 4000Hz are in the stop band, they are diminished. fs is the sampling frequency of the data. If the units are Hz, it tells us how many data points are recorded during one second. filtfilt is the function that does the actual filtering on the data, based on the filter (b, a) that was designed previously. Filtering is not a perfect process. Filters have what is called roll-off at the critical 4000Hz frequency.

Ideally, we would like a filter response that falls down straight. Anything in the pass band is untouched, anything in the stop band is shutdown the same way. As you can see, our actual filter does no live up to the ideal. It already slightly attenuates signal that is part of the pass band and it falls much slower in the stop band. If we need a steeper roll off, we can increase the order of our filter.

Some filter types have steeper roll off than others. For example, the Chebyshev type I filter achieves steeper roll off by tolerating some ripple in the pass band.

This can lead to distortions in the data depending on the size of the ripple. The Chebyshev type I filter takes an argument rp that defines the amount of pass band ripple that is tolerated in units of dB. The more ripple we tolerate, the steeper the roll off will be. Here you can see how large ripple causes oscillations in the data.

Generally, the butterworth filter is sufficient for most situations and is safer because it does not ripple. I hope this post helped you filtering your own data. If you want to learn more, check out the SciPy signal docs. Both the butter and cheby1 filter are there with many, many more.

Smoothing Data by Rolling Average with NumPy

Time series data often comes with some amount of noise. One of the easiest ways to get rid of noise is to smooth the data with a simple uniform kernel, also called a rolling average. The title image shows data and their smoothed version. The data is the second discrete derivative from the recording of a neuronal action potential. Derivatives are notoriously noisy. We can get the result shown in the title image with np.convolve

import numpy as np

data = np.load("example_data.npy")
kernel_size = 10
kernel = np.ones(kernel_size) / kernel_size
data_convolved = np.convolve(data, kernel, mode='same')

Convolution is a mathematical operation that combines two arrays. One of those arrays is our data and we convolve it with the kernel array. During convolution we center the kernel at a data point. We multiple each data point in the kernel with each corresponding data point, sum up all the results and that is the new data point at the center. Let’s look at an example.

data = [2, 3, 1, 4, 1]
kernel = [1, 2, 3, 4]
np.convolve(data, kernel)
# array([ 2,  7, 13, 23, 24, 18, 19,  4])

For this result to make sense you must know, that np.convolve flips the kernel around. So step by step the calculations go as follows:

[4, 3, 2, 1]  # The flipped kernel
          x
         [2, 3, 1, 4, 1]  # The data
          2= 2
         [2]

   [4, 3, 2, 1]
          x  x
         [2, 3, 1, 4, 1]
          4+ 3= 7
         [2, 7]

      [4, 3, 2, 1]
          x  x  x
         [2, 3, 1, 4, 1]
          6+ 6+ 1=13
         [2, 7, 13]

         [4, 3, 2, 1]
          x  x  x  x
         [2, 3, 1, 4, 1]
          8+ 9+ 2+ 4= 23
         [2, 7,13,23]
# This continues until the arrays stop touching. You get the idea.

One thing you’ll notice is that the edges are problematic. There is really no good way to avoid that. Data points at the edges only see part of the kernel but the mode parameter defines what should happen at the edges. I prefer the 'same' mode because it means that the new array will have the same shape as the original data, which makes plotting easier. However, if you start to use more complicated kernels, the edges might become virtually useless. In that case, mode should be 'valid'. Then, the values at the edges that did not see the entire kernel are discarded. The output array is smaller in shape than the input array.

data = [2, 3, 1, 4, 1]
kernel = [1, 2, 3, 4]
np.convolve(data, kernel, mode='valid')
array([23, 24])

The default behavior you saw above is called 'full'. It keeps all data points, so the output array is larger in shape than the input array. You might also have noticed that the size of the kernel is very important. Actually, we need to divide the array of ones by its length. Can you guess what would happen if we forgot about dividing it?

If you guessed that the signal would become larger in magnitude you guessed right. We would be summing up all data points in the kernel. By dividing it we ensure that we take the average of the data points. But the kernel size is even more important. If we make the kernel larger the outcome changes dramatically.

kernel_size = 10
kernel = np.ones(kernel_size) / kernel_size
data_convolved_10 = np.convolve(data, kernel, mode='same')

kernel_size = 20
kernel = np.ones(kernel_size) / kernel_size
data_convolved_20 = np.convolve(data, kernel, mode='same')

plt.plot(data_convolved_20)
plt.plot(data_convolved_10)
plt.legend(("Kernel Size 10", "Kernel Size 20"))

The larger we make the kernel, the smaller sharp peaks become. The peaks are also shifted in time. To be specific, a rolling mean is a low-pass filter. This means that is leaves low frequency signals alone, while making high frequency signals smaller. Sharp increases in the data have a high frequency. If we make the kernel larger, the filter attenuates high frequency signals more. This is exactly how the rolling average works. It gets rid of high frequency noise. It also means that we must be careful not to distort the signal too much with the rolling average filter.